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Photo: A9 Studio (Shutterstock) Windows 11 can run Android apps as if they’re native PC software, but only a handful are officially supported at the time of this writing. However, there’s a way to sideload unsupported apps to Windows 11, similar to how you can install third-party apps on your Android phone. You’ll need a few things to pull this off. First, you’ll need to be in the Windows 11 Insider Program and have the Windows Subsystem for Android app installed. You can find out more information about joining the beta from Microsoft’s announcement blogpost . Second, you’ll need to install Android Debug Bridge (ADB) on your PC. We have a guide for installing ADB on Windows 10 , and the process carries over to Windows 11. Third, you need the APK files for the apps you want to install. You can find these from trusted sources like APK Mirror, APKPure, F-Droid, Github, or the XDA Developer forums. Just make sure you download legitimate files (meaning non-pirated) from websites you know are safe. Bootleg APKs can be riddled with malware or hosted on unsafe domains, and downloading pirated software is, y’know, illegal. Finally, you may also need to sideload the MicroG APK in order to use apps that check for Google Play Services verification. MicroG is open-source software that essentially replicates Google’s services so you can use apps on otherwise unsupported devices. This is an optional step, and you’ll have to install MicroG using the steps below, but it’s […]