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It’s cheap, efficient, and you probably already have it in your kitchen. Photo: NUM LPPHOTO (Shutterstock) Turkey gravy should be intensely rich and savory, just thick enough to coat a slice of turkey, and brown in color. Color does not always indicate flavor, but there is something wrong about white gravy on white meat. I like my gravy to have contrast, especially when served as part of a highly-photographed meal—and nothing brings the brown like onion skins. Onion skins are highly pigmented, so much so that they’re often used as a natural dye . When added to stock, they impart a deep amber color, but not too much flavor. To see how much color they brought to the stock pot, Cook’s Illustrated made too different batches of a simple chicken stock: One made with skin-on onions, and one made with peeled onions. The stock made with the skin-on onions was much darker, which you can see by clicking through to the full article . But in the case of turkey stock, which will go on to be turkey gravy, I like to take things even further by adding extra onion-less skins to the pot. (The onions must be tan or brown in color—red onion skins will not work for our purposes.) There’s really not much to it: Every time you peel an onion, set the skins aside, then place them in a freezer bag and store them in the freezer until you’re ready to make stock. Chuck them in […]