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Photo: KieferPix (Shutterstock) Grief is a normal part of coping with a loss. Whether it’s the death of a loved one, coping with a major illness, or navigating the end of a relationship, grief looks and feels different for everyone. While many people find that talking about their grief can help them make sense of their loss, there are also times when it won’t help—or when it might even make you feel worse. “Based on where you are in your grief, and the nature of your loss and your support network, it can be really useful to talk about grief,” said Krista St-Germain , a grief expert who hosts the podcast The Widowed Mom . “In early acute grief, talking about it helps make it real, and helps you come to that place of acceptance.” But St-Germain also notes there are two main times when talking may not help with your grief. When you’re talking to people who don’t understand Sure, it sounds obvious: Talking to someone who doesn’t understand your grief probably isn’t going to be helpful. But it can often be hard to predict ahead of time, and often even those closest to us may not understand what we’re going through. We may also experience disenfranchised grief , which is when a loss is minimized, misunderstood, or even unacknowledged by others. For example, you may be mourning the loss of a romantic relationship or a close friendship, which—to an outsider—may seem like a minimal loss. But to […]