Read Full Article here… lifehacker.com

Photo: MaraZe (Shutterstock) If you eat chicken eggs, you probably have a shell color preference for reasons you can’t explain. Some people only buy brown eggs because they believe they’re “healthier” or more “natural” than white—but is that based on anything more than marketing? What makes an egg white, brown, green, blue, or pink, and does it even really matter? Shell color tells you absolutely nothing about what’s inside an egg. When it comes to flavor and nutritional content, all chicken eggs are more or less the same. The characteristics that make some eggs more delicious than others—like extra-large, electric yellow yolks and richer flavor—are mostly a product of whatever the chicken who laid them was eating at the time and the environment they live in. Eggs laid by happy chickens who eat table scraps will always beat the factory-farmed options at the supermarket, but store-bought white eggs are no different from the brown ones next to them on the shelf. (To address another common misconception: White eggs are not just brown eggs that have been bleached.) If all eggs are the same inside, why do they come in so many different colors? It’s pretty simple: Different breeds lay different colored eggs. Most commercially-farmed chickens are Leghorns , a breed that lays white eggs; thus, most eggs at the grocery store have white shells. But there are dozens of different chicken breeds out there, some of which deposit pigments on the surface of their eggs before laying them. It’s […]