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Photo: jarabee123 (Shutterstock) In my house, we don’t do slime. Its slick, viscous texture has horrified me from the start, not only for its germ, dirt, and hair-collecting nature, but for the way it clings mercilessly to every substance it comes in contact with. On occasion, though, one of my kids comes home from school or a birthday party with slime, so resisting my instincts to discard it immediately, I have settled for a strict “only in the kitchen” rule. Which is why, when my daughter recently returned from an excursion with her dad and a friend, it was the first time in nine years of parenting that I’d had to contend with getting slime out of clothes. When I saw her vehemently scrubbing with a dry washcloth at what she called “putty” (yeah right, slime marketers, you can call it putty, but it is still colored glue ), I hit up Google for instructions. How to remove wet slime Wet slime is apparently easier to remove than dry slime (I couldn’t tell you firsthand because I didn’t have the pleasure of being gifted wet slime.) First, remove as much as you can before it dries. Then soak it in white vinegar for ten minutes before using an old toothbrush to scrub the area in a circular motion. Rinse with hot water and launder as usual. (If slime dye is left behind, liberally apply stain remover—or bleach diluted with water if it’s a white garment—and let sit for 15 […]