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Photo: OlgaOtto (Shutterstock) When I first joined TikTok in 2020, I couldn’t go a day without seeing videos about narcissists, “toxic” exes, or emotionally absent parents. While narcissists obviously do exist, the content was so prevalent that you’d be forgiven for thinking narcissists were as common as people named Bob. Narcissism had become the new “OCD”—that is, another clinical term people often misuse to mean “I keep my office organized, and I like to match my paper clips to my push pins.” Two years later, it’s nearly impossible to go on social media without seeing one of the following: ADHD, gaslight, trauma, anxiety, neuro-divergent, or trigger (a descendant of trigger warning). Mental health awareness matters, but with more digital creators making therapy-adjacent mental health content, clinical psychological terms are being thrown around so casually as to obfuscate their actual meanings. And while speaking openly about mental health issues can be a clear positive, as Australian publisher Zee Feed writes, “the overuse of clinical terms on social media risks pathologizing behavior and turning lived experience into content trends.” On the Sci Show , science communicator Hank Green agreed, “Mental health professionals point out that using diagnostic terms as misplaced metaphors for odd behavior, personality traits, or even changes in the stock market ultimately minimizes serious conditions and the people who have them.” Here’s a look at some of the most commonly—and wrongly—used psychological terms, and what they do—and more importantly do not— mean. ADHD: According to the National Institute of […]