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Photo: Piyawat Nandeenopparit (Shutterstock) The day before Superstorm Sandy slammed into my neck of the woods a decade ago, my wife asked if we should move our car off the street. I said, confidently and incorrectly, that our street didn’t typically flood, so we had nothing to worry about. A mere 24 hours and four feet of water in my living room later, our car was floating serenely in the bathtub formerly known as my town. As climate change produces more intense storms, there will be more and more flooded cars out there—and there are already hundreds of thousands . Whether your car is inundated while parked somewhere during a flash flood or if you make the dubious decision to drive into deep water and flood the car yourself, water can do an incredible amount of damage to your vehicle. Cars aren’t designed to handle water from the bottom-up, and the need to circulate air through your engine means there are plenty of ways for water to get inside the vehicle. So what can you do if your car encounters deep water? It all depends on just how deep the water was—but there’s no winning in this scenario, only degrees of losing. Here’s what to do with a car that’s been flooded. Safety first First of all, don’t try to start your car after it’s been flooded until you’re reasonably sure it’s safe to do so. If water got into your engine, starting the car is a surefire way […]