Read Full Article here… lifehacker.com

Photo: fizkes (Shutterstock) At this point, we’re all used to receiving spam texts: Messages purporting to be from your carrier offering you a “gift” for paying your bill, or from “Netflix” asking you to open a link and “update your subscription.” These attempts to rip you off aren’t unusual. What is unusual is when these texts come not from a strange source, but from your own phone number. Receiving a spam text from your own number doesn’t mean you’ve been hacked, though it might seem that way at first. You grumble at receiving yet another awful spam text, only to notice the assailant isn’t some unknown grifter, but you . But no, your number hasn’t been compromised, nor does it mean hackers have stolen your information. This type of spam attack is called “spoofing,” wherein a bad actor sends a message not through their actual email address or phone number, but from whatever source they please—including, increasingly, your own phone number. These phishing attempts are as laughable as they are transparent. Good job, spammers: You figured out how to send a text from my own phone number, and you’re using that power to carry out the same tired scams you were before. Why would I think the scam is real this time, because it looks like I sent it to myself? Is there anything you can do about the problem? Well, you have the same two options you do when you receive any spam messages: You can report them […]