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Photo: barmalini (Shutterstock) One of my hobbies is lurking in a Facebook group called something along the “Trader Joe’s Meal Ideas for Busy Moms.” As in any Facebook group, this one has a fair amount of drama, and several recurring themes: “Look at this bug I found in this bag of produce,” “Look at my charcuterie board,” and “Is this mold?” are a few of my favorite Facebook post genres that appear on a daily basis. That last one—“It this mold?”—is fun because it is almost never mold. Solidified, chilled oil; discoloration; and cheese flavor crystals are common suspects. (Most recently, someone found a white blob in a jar that appeared to be a mouse, but we are still awaiting confirmation from the op.) Anyway. Questionable blobs aside, it is hard to see anyone malign cheese flavor crystals, but few of us have the chance to take Cheese Science 101 in college, so it’s unsurprising that most of us are unable to identify calcium lactate and/or tyrosine crystals on sight. What are those “cheese crystals,” exactly? There are two main types of flavor crystals you can encounter on cheese: Calcium lactate and tyrosine. Neither have a flavor of their own, but their presence indicates the cheese has gone through some tasty changes during the aging process, resulting in more flavorful piece of cheese. What is calcium lactate? Photo: Kateryna Kon (Shutterstock) According to cheesescience.org , calcium lactate is a salt comprised of a calcium ion and lactic acid and […]